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How to Choose a Bariatric Procedure: The Best Weight Loss Surgery for You

By Aurora D. Pryor, MD, Director, Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center

Dr. Aurora D. Pryor
Dr. Aurora D. Pryor

The decision to have weight loss surgery is a big one, but the decision about which procedure is equally important. There are several effective choices for surgical weight loss. The question is, which one will be best for you?

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery provides an excellent overview of bariatric procedures. The most commonly performed procedure in the United States is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBG).

Stony Brook's interdisciplinary Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center offers comprehensive treatment: medical management, exercise, behavior modification, counseling, nutrition, and a complete range of bariatric surgeries.

The RYGB works by making your stomach smaller and bypassing some of your intestine to rework your metabolism. It provides excellent long-term weight loss, and is an ideal procedure for most diabetic patients.

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LapBand or Realize band) works by putting a belt around your stomach to limit how much you can eat. Bands are adjustable, requiring you to come back to see your doctor, but they are the lowest risk of the available surgical options.

Sleeve gastrectomy limits how much you eat by surgically removing a large portion of your stomach. There also seem to be some effects with sleeve on your metabolism. Although long-term complications are low with sleeve gastrectomy, I still recommend regular follow-up.

With all the available choices, I feel the best way to decide is to meet with your surgeon. Be sure to choose a surgeon that does a variety of procedures to give you options. At the Stony Brook Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Center, we work together to help you decide the best procedure for you.

Come to my two-hour Bariatric and Metabolic Weight Loss Seminar on Monday, November 7, 2011, starting at 5:00 pm, at Stony Brook University Medical Center. Learn more about treatment options.

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