• A
  • A
  • A

School of Medicine

Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook - was founded in 1971 as the Stony Brook University School of Medicine and includes 25 academic departments. The three missions of the School are to advance the understanding of the origins of human health and disease; train the next generation of committed, curious and highly capable physicians; and deliver world-class compassionate healthcare. As a member of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and a Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accredited medical school, Stony Brook is one of the foremost institutes of higher medical education in the country. Each year the School trains nearly 500 medical students and more than 480 medical residents and fellows. Faculty research includes National Institutes of Health-sponsored programs in neurological diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, biomedical imaging, regenerative medicine, infectious diseases, and many other topics. Physicians on the Renaissance School of Medicine faculty deliver world-class medical care through more than 30,000 inpatient, 80,000 emergency room, and approximately 350,000 outpatient visits annually at Stony Brook University Hospital and affiliated clinical programs, making its clinical services one of the largest and highest quality on Long Island, New York.

To learn more, visit renaissance.stonybrookmedicine.edu.

The Center for Molecular Medicine is designed to meet the specific needs of the Renaissance School of Medicine's thematic research programs. The center offers facilities for transgenic animal experiments, high resolution NMR, x-ray diffraction, and molecular modeling studies, as well as isolation rooms for experiments using pathogenic organisms. A highly advanced informatics system links researchers to scientists throughout the world.

In 1998, Stony Brook established an NIH funded General Clinical Research Center (GCRC), which offers the very latest in clinical research and provides a strong infrastructure that enables clinician scientists to conduct extramural supported research studies. The NIH also supports major training programs in Pharmacology, Cancer, Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology, and Biophysics.